Tuesday, July 16, 2024

Louis CK’s Movie is Unwatchable, Has Scenes of Simulated Masturbation and Main Character Hollywood Director Pedophile

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The Louis CK story deepens.

First, he’s admitted to the acts of sexual perversion he’s been accused of, in a statement below.

Second, his movie– which The Orchard has dropped– arrived in critics mailboxes today. I’m halfway through it, and it’s unwatchable.

In “I Love You, Daddy” Louis plays a rich New York TV producer. Charlie Day plays Louis’s sidekick who simulates masturbation at least a couple of times while Edie Falco, playing Louie’s assistant, is in the room.

John Malkovich plays a famous movie director who has a thing for young girls, stalks them, and is said to be a pedophile.

Chloe Grace Moretz plays Louis’s oversexualized 17 year old daughter, whom Malkovich preys on and with whom Louis is unnaturally obsessed.

The acting level is a D. The cinematography and editing are supposed to mimic a Woody Allen movie. “I Love You, Daddy” is shot in black and while and music left over from a bad Douglas Sirk movie.

It’s painful, sad film that no one should ever see.

With insurance, The Orchard– the small distributor that paid $5 million for this thing– has dodged a bullet.

Here’s Louis’s real life statement:

“These stories are true,” C.K. says in a statement sent by his rep Lewis Kay. “At the time, I said to myself that what I did was okay because I never showed a woman my d–k without asking first, which is also true. But what I learned later in life, too late, is that when you have power over another person, asking them to look at your d–k isn’t a question. It’s a predicament for them. The power I had over these women is that they admired me. And I wielded that power irresponsibly.”

“I have been remorseful of my actions. And I’ve tried to learn from them. And run from them. Now I’m aware of the extent of the impact of my actions. I learned yesterday the extent to which I left these women who admired me feeling badly about themselves and cautious around other men who would never have put them in that position. I also took advantage of the fact that I was widely admired in my and their community, which disabled them from sharing their story and brought hardship to them when they tried because people who look up to me didn’t want to hear it. I didn’t think that I was doing any of that because my position allowed me not to think about it. There is nothing about this that I forgive myself for. And I have to reconcile it with who I am. Which is nothing compared to the task I left them with.”

“I wish I had reacted to their admiration of me by being a good example to them as a man and given them some guidance as a comedian, including because I admired their work.”

He goes on, “The hardest regret to live with is what you’ve done to hurt someone else. And I can hardly wrap my head around the scope of hurt I brought on them. I’d be remiss to exclude the hurt that I’ve brought on people who I work with and have worked with who’s professional and personal lives have been impacted by all of this, including projects currently in production: the cast and crew of Better Things, Baskets, The Cops, One Mississippi, and I Love You Daddy. I deeply regret that this has brought negative attention to my manager Dave Becky who only tried to mediate a situation that I caused. I’ve brought anguish and hardship to the people at FX who have given me so much The Orchard who took a chance on my movie. and every other entity that has bet on me through the years.”

He concludes the statement, “I’ve brought pain to my family, my friends, my children and their mother. I have spent my long and lucky career talking and saying anything I want. I will now step back and take a long time to listen.”

Roger Friedman
Roger Friedmanhttps://www.showbiz411.com
Roger Friedman began his Showbiz411 column in April 2009 after 10 years with Fox News, where he created the Fox411 column. His movie reviews are carried by Rotten Tomatoes, and he is a member of both the movie and TV branches of the Critics Choice Awards. His articles have appeared in dozens of publications over the years including New York Magazine, where he wrote the Intelligencer column in the mid 90s and covered the OJ Simpson trial, and Fox News (when it wasn't so crazy) where he covered Michael Jackson. He is also the writer and co-producer of "Only the Strong Survive," a selection of the Cannes, Sundance, and Telluride Film festivals, directed by DA Pennebaker and Chris Hegedus.

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