How hard is it to actually surprise a celebrity these days? The folks at RCA Music Group really tried hard last night, and it worked. They tossed’ a surprise party for Jamie Foxx on the third floor of the new Armani store on Fifth Avenue. It worked. When Foxx stepped off the elevator, he truly looked shocked.

The occasion was to give Foxx plaques for his mega-million selling album, “Intuition,” and its hit single, “Blame It.” You can see the star-studded video for that track here.

“Blame It” featuring T-Pain was No. 1 on the R&B charts for 12 weeks. Now it’s a pop hit. Foxx manages to fit all this in, mind you, between movies. He’s also a Best Actor Oscar winner. And he does a great Obama imitation.

He told a funny story last night in front of all the record company people who made “Intuition” a success, including his music manager Breyon Prescott and his everything-else manager Marcus King. He was on TV in “In Living Color” doing skits. He was playing a transvestite in a skit, but wanted to get a tape of his music to Teddy Riley, who was on the show that week.

(L-R) Breyon Prescott, Jamie Foxx, Marcus King

(L-R) Breyon Prescott, Jamie Foxx, Marcus King

“I ran up to him in costume. He saw this big muscular transvestite coming at him, and he said, You know I feel very uncomfortable right now.”

Foxx noted that if he’d become a hit singer back then, his career would probably be over by now. “Instead, here I am.”

And here’s a little news: even though “Intuition” was released just this past December. and Foxx has plenty of singles left on it, he’s set to put a whole NEW album together come this December. If it’s half as good as the current CD, and the one before it, “Unpredictable,” we can’t wait.

And oh yeah: Clive Davis was not there because he’s working with Harry Connick, Jr. on an album that’s supposed to be “amazing.” Nevertheless, Jamie never forgets that it was Davis who put him on stage at his annual pre-Grammy bash a few weeks before Foxx won his Oscar for “Ray.” Foxx was a smash hit, and surprised the crowd as a musician and singer. The rest, as they say, is history.

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